Tung Lin Kok Yuen International Conference

Buddhist Canons: In Search of a Theoretical Foundation for a Wisdom-oriented Education

27 & 28 November, 2021 (HKT) | Online & On-site at HKU

Jointly organized by

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The Conference is sponsored by

Tung Lin Kok Yuen.

Speaker
Presentation Topic
Ven. K. L. Dhammajoti
Chair Professor, School of Philosophy, Renmin University of China
(Topic - to be confirmed)
Wu Jiang
Professor of the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona
Opening the Canon: New Challenges to Buddhist Studies in Humanities Education
Jin Y. Park
Professor and Chair, Department of Philosophy and Religion, American University, Washington
Buddhism and Engaged Citizenship
Albert Welter
Head, Department of East Asian Studies, The University of Arizona
Retrieving the Dharma Wheel: Searching for Meaning in the Sino-East Asian Buddhist Canon
Huaiyu Chen
Associate Professor, Buddhism and Chinese Religions, Arizona State University
Shaping the Order of Ritualized Community in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Monasticism
Ven. Bhikkhuni Dhammadinna
Director, Āgama Research Group, Department of Buddhist Studies, Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts, Taiwan
Knowledge tied to or freed from identity? Epistemic reflections through the prism of the early Buddhist teachings
Guang Xing
Director and Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Educating the Confucians about Filial Piety: Qisong’s Treatise on Filial Piety
Georgios T. Halkias
Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Translations and Transmissions of Wisdom from the Earliest Canonical Collections of Tibetan Buddhism.
Oren Hanner
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, New York University Abu Dhabi
Vasubandhu on the Role of the Teacher and the Features of Wisdom-Oriented Education
Ernest C. H. Ng
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
From Tradition to Innovation: Wisdom-oriented Education in Buddhist Theory and Practice
Chengzhong Pu
Assistant Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
On ‘foshuo佛説’ in the Title of Some Chinese Buddhist Sutras
Ven. Sik Hin Hung
Senior Fellow and Former Director, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
G. A. Somaratne
Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Conjoining Scientific Knowledge and Dhamma Knowledge for Creating an Authentic Person
Ven. Sumana Thera
Ph.D. candidate, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
Asanga Tilakaratne
Emeritus Professor of Buddhist Studies, Department of Buddhist Studies, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
Knowledge and Wisdom from an early Buddhist Perspective
Chung-hui Tsui
Honorary Assistant Professor and Tung Lin Kok Yuen Scholar in Buddhist Art and Culture, HKU Centre of Buddhist Studies
The Buddhist texts translation in Dharmarakṣa’s team
Bonnie W. Y. Wu
Lecturer, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
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G. A. Somaratne

Associate Professor

Centre of Buddhist Studies

The University of Hong Kong

G.A. Somaratne (PhD, Northwestern) is Associate Professor in Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong. He is a Sri Lankan scholar in early Buddhism and Pali textual criticism. He was formerly Co-director of Dhammachai Tipiṭaka Project (Thailand), Rector of Sri Lanka International Buddhist Academy, Professor in Pali and Buddhist Studies, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka), and Associate Professor in Religion, Miyazaki International College (Japan). His publications include The Buddha’s Teaching: A Buddhistic Analysis (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021) & The Saṃyuttanikāya Volume I(Pali Text Society, Oxford, 1998).

Conjoining Scientific Knowledge and Dhamma Knowledge for Creating an Authentic Person

The Buddha taught the Dhamma, revealing our conscious reality’s elementary constituents (dhammā) and their functions (dhammatā) and laws (dhamma-niyāmatā), showing how we suffer because of not-knowing the Dhammaand how we can stop suffering by knowing it. The Dhamma knowledge is thus the knowledge of dhammā, dhammatā, and dhamma-niyāmatā, that provides a holistic vision of life and world, in contrast to the scientific knowledge that gives an abstract and fragmented vision of the material world, creating an inauthentic worldly person who merely seeks material well-being by holding into matter. The Dhamma knowledge, on the other hand, creates an authentic person who seeks primarily mental well-being while developing a non-clinging attitude toward matter. For a worldly person in the modern world, a life driven by Dhamma knowledge alone may not be sensible. Therefore, the type of wisdom-oriented education that could be considered holistic and sensible to today's world should consist of both types of knowledge. In this sense, the two knowledge types are not rivals but two complementary perspectives of reality with two different aims. The Scientific knowledge takes us to material well-being more, and the Dhamma knowledge takes us to mental and spiritual well-being more. The Buddha’s teaching in the Suttas explain a threefold process of learning, understanding, and experiencing the Dhamma. Accordingly, the initial Dhamma learning should be through a formal curriculum; next, understanding and seeing the dhammā, dhammatā and dhamma-niyāmatā in one’s experiential world will take place through repeated acquiring and reflection of the Dhammaknowledge; finally, attaining and experiencing the unconditioned dhamma (nibbāna) will take place through repeated understanding and seeing. Therefore, this paper attempts to show that the first and the second stages of the gradual process in particular, together with the scientific knowledge, can help creating an authentic person who has understanding and vision to maintain a sound moral life and  face the changing worldly conditions such as gain and loss, fame and disrepute, praise and blame, and pleasure and pain, with a balanced state of mind, being neither elated nor dejected, and die mindfully and pass old age without grumbling about it.

Enquiry
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Centre of Buddhist Studies of
The University of Hong Kong
 
Email - cbsevent@hku.hk

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