Tung Lin Kok Yuen International Conference

Buddhist Canons: In Search of a Theoretical Foundation for a Wisdom-oriented Education

27 & 28 November, 2021 (HKT) | Online & On-site at HKU

Jointly organized by

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The Conference is sponsored by

Tung Lin Kok Yuen.

Speaker
Presentation Topic
Ven. K. L. Dhammajoti
Chair Professor, School of Philosophy, Renmin University of China
(Topic - to be confirmed)
Wu Jiang
Professor of the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona
Opening the Canon: New Challenges to Buddhist Studies in Humanities Education
Jin Y. Park
Professor and Chair, Department of Philosophy and Religion, American University, Washington
Buddhism and Engaged Citizenship
Albert Welter
Head, Department of East Asian Studies, The University of Arizona
Retrieving the Dharma Wheel: Searching for Meaning in the Sino-East Asian Buddhist Canon
Huaiyu Chen
Associate Professor, Buddhism and Chinese Religions, Arizona State University
Shaping the Order of Ritualized Community in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Monasticism
Ven. Bhikkhuni Dhammadinna
Director, Āgama Research Group, Department of Buddhist Studies, Dharma Drum Institute of Liberal Arts, Taiwan
Knowledge tied to or freed from identity? Epistemic reflections through the prism of the early Buddhist teachings
Guang Xing
Director and Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Educating the Confucians about Filial Piety: Qisong’s Treatise on Filial Piety
Georgios T. Halkias
Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Translations and Transmissions of Wisdom from the Earliest Canonical Collections of Tibetan Buddhism.
Oren Hanner
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, New York University Abu Dhabi
Vasubandhu on the Role of the Teacher and the Features of Wisdom-Oriented Education
Ernest C. H. Ng
Adjunct Assistant Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
From Tradition to Innovation: Wisdom-oriented Education in Buddhist Theory and Practice
Chengzhong Pu
Assistant Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
On ‘foshuo佛説’ in the Title of Some Chinese Buddhist Sutras
Ven. Sik Hin Hung
Senior Fellow and Former Director, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
G. A. Somaratne
Associate Professor, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
Conjoining Scientific Knowledge and Dhamma Knowledge for Creating an Authentic Person
Ven. Sumana Thera
Ph.D. candidate, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
Asanga Tilakaratne
Emeritus Professor of Buddhist Studies, Department of Buddhist Studies, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka
Knowledge and Wisdom from an early Buddhist Perspective
Chung-hui Tsui
Honorary Assistant Professor and Tung Lin Kok Yuen Scholar in Buddhist Art and Culture, HKU Centre of Buddhist Studies
The Buddhist texts translation in Dharmarakṣa’s team
Bonnie W. Y. Wu
Lecturer, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong
The Utilization of the Three Types of Knowing in the Development of Buddhist-based Psychotherapeutic Intervention
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Georgios T. Halkias

Associate Professor

Centre of Buddhist Studies

The University of Hong Kong

Georgios T. Halkias is an expert on Indo-Tibetan religious history and doctrines and the development of contemplative cultures of Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna Buddhism in Tibet and across the Himalayas. An Associate Professor at the Centre of Buddhist Studies at the University of Hong Kong, Halkias pursued postgraduate studies in Comparative Philosophy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Film Studies at the University of Amsterdam, and completed his DPhil in Oriental Studies from the University of Oxford. He has published extensively on a variety of topics including, canonical Buddhist studies, Indo-Tibetan Pure Land Buddhism, Himalayan Studies, and Indo-Greek Buddhism. He has participated in several international research programs in the UK and Germany, and is currently the co-editor-in-chief of the Oxford Encyclopaedia of Buddhism and co-PI in a collaborative research project titled Infrastructures of Faith: Religious Mobilities on the Belt and Road at the University of Hong Kong.

Translations and Transmissions of Wisdom from the Earliest Canonical Collections of Tibetan Buddhism.

The ninth century marked the first large-scale transmission of Indian Buddhism to Tibet and witnessed the translation of nearly one thousand Buddhist scriptures imported from India and Central Asia. These state-sponsored translations aimed at propagating and preserving the teachings of Buddhism while being comprehensible to a local audience. The success of this enterprise relied on pairing Indian scholars (Skt. paṇḍita) with bilingual Tibetan translators (Tib. lo tsā ba; lotsāwa) who followed closely Sanskrit-Tibetan dictionaries and grouped together texts of similar philosophical content and orientation according to established doxographical categories. These Tibetan translations, mostly of Sanskrit Buddhist texts, formed the first proto-canonical collections of Tibetan Buddhism and are praised till this day for their consistency and precision.


The wisdom of the Buddha would not have been transmitted without knowledge of his teachings. Drawing from imperial Tibetan Buddhist catalogues (Tib. dkar chag; karchak) and authorised lexica like the Mahāvyutpatti, this presentation will highlight the hermeneutic project of translating knowledge into wisdom and wisdom into knowledge as an essential part of Buddhist education. The Tibetan notion of the “scholar-practitioner” (Tib. mkhas grub; kedrüp) may serve as an ideal model for an individual who is both genuinely knowledgeable of the philosophical and soteriological doctrines of Buddhism, but also possesses practical experience of the teachings and their skilful application in contemplation and introspective meditation. The lessons that present-day educators may derive from the earliest Tibetan Mahāyāna canons suggests that “wisdom-oriented education” ought to rely on an unprejudiced understanding and knowledge of the subject-matter that aims to be transmitted, as well as on a variety of methods for presenting it accurately to its intended audiences according to their background and abilities.

Enquiry
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Centre of Buddhist Studies of
The University of Hong Kong
 
Email - cbsevent@hku.hk

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